Question:

How to become freelancer in germany?

10 October, 2021 Gregory Wiers 6

Answers (6):

  • AUTHOR: LOGAN CENTER
    16 October, 2021

    Becoming a freelancer in Germany is not hard by any means. All you need to do is register for one or more jobs, create your bio and wait. You can also apply for contracts (arbeitslosengeld II) which will help you to build up your reputation as freelancer. Lastly, there are lots of networking events organised all over the country! It's worth attending these if you want to build up your network and find new clients that could supplement your income gap. Best of luck!

  • AUTHOR: KEITH DAMRON
    16 October, 2021

    There is no such thing as a freelancer in Germany. The word freelancer exists in English and translates to "free" (part-time) + "lancer" (in German, the word would translate to "freier Mitarbeiter," or free employee). Germans always work full time and freelance only when it comes to their side jobs not related to their primary employment. There is a law that was passed in April 2015 (which makes sense, given the economy and number of unemployed people), which permits employees who were let go by their companies because of restructuring or natural causes, for example if they location was shut down due to cutbacks, temporary illness, etc.

  • AUTHOR: BRANDON HASLETT
    16 October, 2021

    I am afraid that if you really want to become a freelancer in Germany, it will be difficult since Germans are very conservative people and tend to not trust this kind of work devices. They prefer the stability of an employer so they can plan their future. But I am sure if you have some friends who you can provide your services for them, it will help speed up the process so more people will know about it. When more clients will know about your skills, more companies or private employers with them which would give you opportunities. For now try to focus on getting clients where ever possible even though they are few at first stage because this is how one starts out as freelancing.

  • AUTHOR: BRANDON REDNER
    16 October, 2021

    1. Master the skills you need for your profession. 2. Get established in a company or organization that can offer you a steady paycheck for a while. 3. Leave and set up on your own as a freelancer, preferably with an umbrella organisation of some sort behind you - see IFA Strategies at ifa-strategies dot com. 4. Improve the quality of what you do so that it stands out from surrounding competition and attracts attention on its own merits. 5. Once this has happened, add to the workload on the basis of satisfied clients coming back to find more work done by you and eventually step over into employer-actor territory yourself if no one else hire's you first!

  • AUTHOR: ALAN WIERS
    16 October, 2021

    It is possible to become freelancer in germany. But make sure you have the courage of taking that important first step, but also building up your own team, not just working on your own. "How to become freelancer in germany?" - It is possible to become freelance if you are ready for it. You have to have courage and take risks before you can start living the dream! Just remember that even if it's hard at the beginning it will get better with time. Building up a really great team can also give solace when times are tough so don't be afraid of creating something along with being on your own-once you grow together there is nothing more powerful!

  • AUTHOR: RYAN SCHEWE
    16 October, 2021

    In Germany it is not possible to live from freelance work alone. One must earn at least a little bit something from the government every month, for example as social welfare recipient or with some supplementary income like e.g. child benefits, pensions or unemployment benefits (considered "working by the hour"). This requirement exists in order to secure minimal life standards - food and housing. So if you are on below poverty line, then any job would suffice your needs equally well - it simply does not matter if this occupation is registered / legally authorized or not (check out Micawski's "Ways of Being" project on the topic).